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Shaping Infinity, The Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis

2012 Shaping Infinity: The Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis

The 2012 Shaping Infinity, the Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis demonstrates the enormous significance of life sciences innovation to Georgia’s economic growth. The report, the sixth in a series, shows that one out of every 40 jobs in Georgia is tied to the life sciences industry.

During the Great Recession, employment was stable, helping to offset the decline in jobs across all other industry sectors. The life sciences industry and university research, plus the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have a $20 billion annual economic impact on Georgia and employ more than 94,000 people. The industry’s impact alone is nearly $17 billion, employing more than 65,000 people in high-paying, rewarding careers.

From 2007 to 2010, employment in Georgia’s life sciences industry actually increased slightly, a remarkable achievement considering that total statewide employment for all industries declined by 8 percent. Georgia’s life sciences industry pays nearly $5.6 billion in salaries and more than $550 million a year in state and local taxes.

The Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis 2012 was produced by the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth in the Terry College of Business. Selig Center Director Jeffrey Humphreys, Ph.D., conducted the economic impact study. "The fundamental finding of this study,” Dr. Humphreys said, "is that Georgia’s life sciences companies contribute substantial economic activity to Georgia.”

In addition, Shaping Infinity includes commentary from industry and government leaders. Georgia Department of Economic Development Commissioner Chris Cummiskey writes about the addition of Baxter International to the state’s life sciences landscape. Others featured are Greg Duncan, President of UCB’s North American Operations; and Charles Wilmer, M.D., Piedmont Heart Institute’s Board Chairman of Innovation.

There are more than 360 major life sciences companies in Georgia. These companies are listed in the back of Shaping Infinity with their technology focus. The company names are hyperlinked to their websites. You can also explore a spreadsheet listing the Georgia companies searchable by technology focus.

2011 Shaping Infinity: The Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis

The 2011 Shaping Infinity, the Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis, shows bioscience employment remained steady through the worst years of the Great Recession, earning it a description as "recession resistant,” while the economic impact of the industry actually increased substantially, jumping 22% over the past two years.

The report is the fifth in a series produced by the Selig Center for Economic Growth and Director Jeffrey Humphreys, Ph.D. The 2011 report shows the life sciences industry and university research, plus the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have a $23 billion annual economic impact on Georgia and employ more than 105,000 people. The industry’s impact alone is nearly $20 billion, employing more than 75,000 people in high-paying, rewarding careers.

Employment in Georgia’s life sciences industry over the past two years actually increased slightly; a remarkable achievement considering that total statewide employment for all industries dropped by nearly seven percent.  The number of life sciences companies rose by 14 percent and average annual pay increased three percent. Georgia’s life sciences industry salaries average $64,500, which is 50 percent higher than the average of $42,902 for all industries.

In addition to economic impact data and findings from a survey of 320 life sciences companies statewide, Shaping Infinity includes commentary from industry, academic and government leaders:

  • Nathan Deal, Governor of GeorgiaChris Cummiskey, Commissioner, Georgia Department of Economic Development.
  • Stacy Williams Shuker, Ph.D., Director of the Center of Innovation for Life Sciences
  • Ed Schutter, RPh, MBA, President and CEO of Arbor Pharmaceuticals
  • Michael F. Adams, Ph.D., President of University of Georgia
  • Ricardo Azziz, M.D., MPH, MBA, President of Georgia Health Sciences University

The economic data for Shaping Infinity is based on a survey of 320 companies in Georgia. These companies are listed in the back of the report with their technology focus. The company names are hyperlinked to their websites.


2009 Shaping Infinity   

Shaping Infinity, the Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis 2009, not only provides data and commentary on the progress of the state’s life sciences companies, but also features the first-ever study of the economic impact of the life sciences industry on Georgia.

The 2009 analysis was produced by the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth in the Terry College of Business. Selig Center Director Dr. Jeffrey Humphreys conducted the economic impact study. In addition, Governor Sonny Perdue and Georgia Department of Economic Development Commissioner Kenneth Stewart have written articles on the state’s efforts to support the life sciences industry. Articles describing the breakthrough research and product development in Georgia also feature:

  • Solvay Pharmaceuticals President and CEO Stephen Hill;
  • Georgia State University President Mark Becker;
  • Georgia Center of Energy Innovation Director Jill Stuckey;
  • Georgia Institute of Technology’s Mark Allen, Vice Provost for Research and Innovation, and James Meindl, Director of the Nanotechnology Research Center;
  • Quintiles’ Dan Brown, Vice President and General Manager Quintiles North American Laboratories, and Andrew Cunningham, Executive Director of Quintiles Southeast Clinical Development Services.

Shaping Infinity 2009, the fourth annual report, also plots the growth of Georgia’s life sciences industry since 2005.


Shaping Infinity 2008

The 2008 Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis not only provides data and commentary on the progress of the state’s life sciences companies, but also features articles from Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue and Georgia Department of Economic Development Commissioner Kenneth Stewart on the state’s efforts to support industry growth.

The report provides a full range of data from venture capital raised by start-ups to the life sciences-related products manufactured and marketed by established companies.  In addition to Governor Perdue and Commissioner Stewart, the leaders of Altea Therapeutics, Medical College of Georgia, Merial, and Sciele Pharma have written articles for the report describing their breakthrough research and product development.

The 2008 Shaping Infinity also heralds the 2009 Biotechnology Industry Organization International Convention, May 18-21, 2009, in Atlanta. This is the largest biotechnology convention in the world. It is a reflection of the dramatic growth in Georgia’s life sciences industry that this international convention is coming to Georgia and the Southeast for the first time.


Shaping Infinity 2007

The Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis 2007 reveals Georgia’s life sciences industry, between 2001 and 2006, grew much faster than the average for all other industry sectors in the state.  The annual report shows the number of life sciences establishments increased by an impressive 38.3 percent between 2001 and 2006, compared to a 13.8 percent average growth rate for all other industry sectors in Georgia.

The 44-page report tracks the progress of Georgia’s life sciences industry and includes data and trends on number of companies, revenues, products on the market and in development, capital raised, and workforce composition. Shaping Infinity also includes articles spotlighting UCB Inc., Georgia Venture Partners, C2 Biofuels, Emory University, Morehouse School of Medicine and University of Georgia.


Shaping Infinity 2006

This inaugural report reveals that more than 250 life sciences companies combined with Georgia’s universities and other research institutions, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have a huge impact on the state’s economy. The dramatic growth in the number of companies over the last decade clearly demonstrates this is an industry on the move with enormous potential.

Georgia Bio, in association with the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia's Terry College of Business, produces the annual Georgia Life Sciences Industry Analysis, titled Shaping Infinity.  This is the only analysis of Georgia's private sector life sciences industry.

Shaping Infinity

Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Shaping Infinity 2012 PDF (4.4 MB) Administration 2/18/2014
Shaping Infinity 2011 PDF (1.95 MB) Administration 2/18/2014
Shaping Infinity 2009 PDF (194.38 KB) Administration 2/18/2014
Shaping Infinity 2008 PDF (4.83 MB) Administration 2/18/2014
Shaping Infinity 2007 PDF (511.19 KB) Administration 2/18/2014
Shaping Infinity 2006 PDF (3.55 MB) Administration 2/18/2014
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